What is your most innovative recruiting tip or hiring best practice?

You can learn a lot from years of hunting and hiring.

The Trick is to Know What You’re Hunting For

When you set out to hire, you need to know exactly what type of candidate you want. List all the traits that candidate would have. Do they need a certain number of years of experience? Should they be willing to travel? Do they have an MBA or another graduate degree?

Create your list, and always keep it in mind. You have to understand who you’re looking for before you start, otherwise you may wind up with someone who doesn’t fulfill your requirements.

Know What To Ignore

You should know what you don’t want in a candidate, too.

I know a CEO who gave the keynote speech at a COO training seminar, simply because he wanted to scout for a COO. He ended up writing off nearly everyone at the convention because they showed up late to the training seminar. He didn’t want someone who would brush off training, and he stuck to that—even when it meant getting rid of a lot of otherwise qualified candidates.

Knowing what you don’t want in a candidate is just as important when scouting for the right hire.

Don’t Be Afraid To Leave With Nothing

When hiring, don’t choose a candidate you don’t like because you’re desperate for anyone.

Remember, it’s always better to leave with nothing than to leave with the wrong candidate.

Preparation Is Key

A lot of companies put themselves in the opposite situation. They only hire when a gap appears. At that point, patience is no longer possible. They need someone now.

To avoid this, map out your hiring needs for at least one year out. Why? Because scrambling to hire someone is a sure-fire way to get the wrong candidate. Filling holes as they open leads to compromises, quick decisions, and less-than-ideal hires.

Have a plan in place for low growth, average growth, and hyper growth, so that you’re prepared for any situation.

IPA can help with your recruitment needs with a network you can trust! Recruit and list some fantastic employees with our unique RMS system. We are only a click away! Happy Recruiting!

How to Keep Second-Place Candidates Interested in Your Company

Every once in a lucky while, you’ll reach the end of the interview process with two candidates who would both make a great addition to your company. While you might have a hard time deciding between them, ultimately something will tip the scales in one candidate’s favor — perhaps one has more experience under their belt, or possesses hard-to-find skills. It can be tough to let that other candidate know that you’ve chosen someone else for the job — but the good news is, you don’t need to let them go entirely.

It’s always beneficial” to nurture relationships with second-place candidates. “‘Second place’ candidates have many times been the one to receive the offer, for a wide variety of reasons — the first place candidate withdraws[…] or the first place candidate doesn’t pass the drug or background check. Also, the next assignment that comes in may fit the second place candidate so nicely they become the first place candidate for the role!

But how exactly can you keep a second-place candidate interested if you don’t have an opportunity for them at the moment? Here are a few of the top tips.

Let Them Down Gently

An interested candidate never wants to hear that they didn’t get the job, but if you message it correctly, you can leave them feeling good about themselves and open to future opportunities. It shouldn’t feel artificially cheery or phony, though — make sure you’re authentic in your response.

If we think the person is a good fit, we make that known. Often, we, or our recruiter, will have a phone conversation with them which goes like this: ‘We had lots of great candidates who applied for the position. We think you would be a great addition to our company, however, [we] have chosen to offer the position to another candidate. Would you be open to hearing from us in the future?

Explain the decision to go with another candidate[…] Offer any interview feedback if needed, but also say it was a tough decision on the team and would love to hire both but just don’t have the budget right now and that you’d [like] to stay close for future opportunities.

If you know a timeline of when that budget might come in, or when a role fitting their experience and skills may open, make sure to share that with them.

Establish Ongoing Communication

HR experts agree that the best way to keep a strong candidate interested in your company is to proactively engage with them.

Follow up with them every few weeks. This is often overlooked because it is cumbersome, but following up with a potential candidate every few weeks can not only keep [them] interested, it can also build their appreciation for your organization.

And of course, keep candidates in the loop regarding new opportunities.

Be Honest on Timing

It’s understandable to want to keep a candidate on deck, but if you’re interacting with them for months on end and have no idea when a relevant position will open, you need to let them know.

That being said, as long as you’re open about what the candidate can expect, there’s nothing wrong with engaging them as long as they’re still interested.

So the next time you have to choose between two stellar candidates, don’t lament having to let open of them go — see it as a valuable opportunity to grow your talent pool.

7 Tips to Becoming a Better Recruiter in 2019

Being a recruiter allows you the freedom to be creative in your profession. Many recruiters love their jobs because they build a world around them — a world of career-minded, driven, money-motivated, and competitive professionals.

The world of recruiting is full of endless opportunities, doors flying open and fulfilling success that you could have never imagined. Perhaps you want to travel the world, build a family or maybe you want to become a subject matter-expert in something you are passionate about.

What Makes a Good Recruiter?
As recruiters, we are gregarious, assertive and curious by nature. A recruiter is essentially a sales person — presenting top talent to leading organizations who are looking for the missing piece of their puzzle. One of our top recruiters in the big data space describes it best: her candidates are so rare she often refers to “finding a unicorn” when she identifies the perfect fit for a role.

If you are strong willed and personable with a passion to succeed, then you have what it takes to get started in the world of recruitment. There is no exact formula for success as a recruiter, it takes hard work, dedication to your industry and of course, you have to earn it.

1. Become a sourcerContact other staffing firms in the area you would like to recruit for and learn the style that they are using. This will allow you to master the screening of resumes, conducting phone interviews, and see how this firm conducts the client interview process.

2. Network on LinkedIn with like-minded people. Join groups relevant to your education, interests and geographical region. Maximizing the number of groups you are in will also maximize your network and you will be able to view and connect with more professionals who are relevant to your desired career path. Many people post available positions to their alumni groups and you then have a direct contact regarding the position.

3. Attend as many networking events as possible. While LinkedIn and career pages make it much easier to apply and learn more about available positions, nothing replaces the power of an in-person intro and exchange of business cards. IPA conferences offer a good networking opportunity. Stay up on your local events via a variety of organizations: www.meetup.comwww.eventbite.comwww.bizjournals.com.

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4. Market your agency with a sell sheet. Your resume is undoubtedly a place to sell your work history, but this can also be done on a company wide basis. How many job seekers are “organized?” Break the mold and showcase expertise and personality to really stand out to candidates and clientele.

5. Pick up the phone. Following up with a phone call after you submit a job ad or placement. This will ensure that you are staying front of mind and aren’t throwing your resume into cyber space.

6. Ask for help. You might not know everything about getting into the recruitment industry. Ask questions of people you know who are familiar with the industry, as well as friends of friends who might be able to get in touch with the right person. The IPA Recruiter Network is the perfect avenue!

7. Do your homework. Research companies that have good reputations and are known for hiring people new to the industry.

If you want in, then get in! Get those postings on the RMS to maximize your chance at getting splits. Let’s make 2019 the best yet!